Snake

Welcome back to Artist’s Corner, the bit of my blog in which I try to pass off rudimentary doodles as art.

For the last few weeks I’ve been posting the same kind of sub-standard drawings as was my way when I first started doing this back in 2017.

But these days I have a collaborative partner in the form of my almost-two-year-old daughter who has kindly embellished my drawings with her own artistic interpretations.

And the results have been astonishing. I mean they’re still quite bad drawings and the scribblings of a toddler do little to redeem them, but it has resulted in some of the most entertaining ‘comments sections’ I’ve ever seen on this blog.

So, people of the blogosphere, you are once again encouraged to channel your own inner art critics and share your pretentious gibberish in the comments section below as you take in the power and majesty of ‘Snake’.

It was originally going to be a frog. That’s what Little Proclaims ‘commissioned’. But when I started drawing the head, I felt that it looked more like a snake. So I finished off the drawing as if I’d meant to draw a snake all along.

Little Proclaims didn’t seem to mind…snake

 

 

Dog

It’s that time of the week again, when I present one of my not-very-good doodles, which my almost-two-year-old daughter has subsequently embellished with her washable felt tips, and then I pretend it’s art. But the collaboration doesn’t end there, because by far the best bit of these posts for the last two weeks has been the comments section, as people try to out-do each other with their own interpretations of the ‘work’. So, no pressure people, but if the comments section isn’t full of more pretentious nonsense this week then I’m going to look like a bit of a fool.

Last week we offered you ‘Cat‘, a disturbing, visceral, yet poignant piece that, in many ways, presented a pessimistic view of the world.

This week, Little Proclaims has opted for a lighter more playful tone and, in many ways, a direct contrast to ‘Cat’ but just as one cannot have the light without the dark, so too we cannot have ‘Cat’ without ‘Dog’.

So here is ‘Dog’

dog

Cat

After the critical acclaim my daughter and I enjoyed last week with our debut collaboration, ‘Helicopter‘, we’re back this week with another of our artistic offerings.

This week, Little Proclaims was keen to show another side of her, quite formidable, talents and has offered a more aggressive, almost brutal, palette to complement the elementary template she commissioned me to produce.

I think this piece, which we’ve called ‘Cat’ is as stark a reflection of our times as you’re likely to come across.

cat

Helicopter

It’s been a little over two years since I troubled the blogosphere with one of my not-very-good drawings. But, though my artistic talents have not improved in that time, I have acquired a new fan of my doodles.

Little Proclaims is quite keen on drawing too, although much of her work appears to be from a more abstract school of art.

Lately though, she has been in a collaborative mood, or perhaps aware of the limitations of her still-developing motor skills, she has become frustrated that she can’t quite create the images she wants.

Her solution is therefore to get me to draw pictures for her. She seems to have far more faith in my ability than is merited, but as I regularly used to post my inane doodles on this blog prior to my daughter’s arrival in this world, I can hardly claim that I don’t also hold a slightly inflated view of my own talent.

Anyway, the game appears to be that she asks (or rather demands repeatedly until I cave in) that I draw something and then she adds her own interpretation to the piece. I expect this will be a ‘thing’ in our lives for some time, and given than I employ absolutely no quality control whatsoever in terms of what I’m prepared to post on this blog, it was always likely that I would use this daddy/daughter activity to generate content.

And lets be fair, it won’t even be close to being the worst thing that I post this week.

So without further ado, I give you our latest masterpiece, which is simply entitled:

Helicopter

helicopter

 

I Am So Clever That Sometimes I Don’t Understand A Single Word Of What I Am Saying

Wilde

Welcome back to Artist’s Corner, the bit of my blog where I wow the world with my artistic talents. Of which I have few.

Prior to my April love letter to the cartoons of my youth, I was using this bit of my blog to pay homage to some of the great literary figures of days gone by. To be fair, they were mostly literary figures whose work I’d never read.

I don’t profess to be an educated man. I mean I am an educated man of sorts, just not a well-educated man. I can read. I just tend to read stuff that isn’t very challenging.

But happily, today’s literary great is someone I can get on board with, because I do enjoy a bit of Oscar Wilde. Indeed I’ve paid homage to the great man on this blog before – in this brilliant piece I wrote way back in the early days of my blogging adventure.

So, it only seems appropriate to pay homage to him again.

Mainly because I drew a picture of him.

Although, I do live Reading, which is of course where he spent some time. Granted, that time was spent in Reading Prison (then known as Reading Gaol) so I don’t suppose he was too fond of the place. I wouldn’t hold that against him. It’s not like he deserved to go to prison, he was just unfortunate to live in less enlightened times.

Indeed, as a town, we are rather fond of our Oscar Wilde connection. Reading Prison ceased actually being a prison back in 2013 and last year it opened its doors to the public for a brief period of time, when it was used to host an art exhibition. I went to it and it was pretty good. Some of the art went over my head a bit, but the history of the prison was a genuinely intriguing reflection of social evolution over the last hundred(ish) years.

Wilde’s cell was open to the public during the exhibition, but, as it had been a working prison up until it’s recent closure, his cell was pretty much the same as all the other cells. Which were all horrible and definitely served as a reminder to me not to commit any crimes.

Or at least not to get caught.

There are a lot of rumours about what is going to be done with the old prison now it’s no longer in use.

One rumour is that they’re going to turn it into a theatre.

I think Wilde would appreciate the irony in that.

 

On Amplifie Également Le Malheur Et Le Bonheur, Nous Ne Sommes Jamais Ni Si Malheureux, Ni Si Heureux Qu’on Le Dit

Balzac

“He’s reading Balzac, knocking back Prozac, it’s a helping hand that makes you feel wonderfully bland”

The first I’d ever heard of Balzac was in the above song lyrics from the Britpop classic ‘Country House’ by Blur. I loved that song when it came out, but then I loved all things Britpop back in the mid-nineties. ‘Country House’ was the single that beat Oasis’ ‘Roll With It’ to the number one slot, back when people cared about the singles chart. It was the beginning of a faux rivalry between the two that would result in both bands going on to sell lots of records. As a fan of both groups at the time, I loved the whole affair, but it was clearly absolute nonsense. This stuff was in the actual news for goodness sake, and not just the tabloid press, it was the number one story on the BBC news.

I wonder what Balzac would have made of it all. Probably not much. He was French and unlikely to have been overly interested in Britpop. Particularly because it all took place 145 years after his death.

I later came across Balzac when I was studying for my degree in French Studies. There was a significant literary component to my course, so studying Balzac was inevitable. Unfortunately, as I was struggling to master French literacy at the time, reading literature in the language was a little beyond me. I couldn’t find an English translation of the Balzac novel we were supposed to read (Le Colonel Chabert) so I chose to study the other authors on the reading list instead – namely Stendhal and Flaubert, for whom the chosen texts were readily available in English. By the end of the course my French was good enough to have a go at the original texts, but by that stage I’d chosen to specialise in other areas – more of the aforementioned Stendhal (on the basis that I’d already read his stuff) and quite a lot of French theatre, (on the basis that plays are quicker and easier to read than novels).

So I never got around to reading any Balzac. I’m not sure if I missed out too much. Mrs Proclaims has read quite a bit, indeed that is predominantly what she spends most of her time doing these days. We met on our degree course. She was the one who came top of all the classes we were in, whereas I was the one who rolled into the lectures bleary-eyed and hungover most of the time.  She seems to not hate Balzac, but I’m not sure she loves his work, so much as she enjoys the act of studying. We’re very different to each other in that regard.

Maybe one day I’ll read some Balzac. Although, if I’m honest, the Prozac does sound more appealing.

There Are Books Of Which The Backs And Covers Are By Far The Best Parts

Dickens

Today I’m taking the unusual step of honouring (through the medium of doodle) a literary figure whose works I am actually familiar with. Because even I have seen The Muppets’ Christmas Carol…

I jest of course, I’ve read actual books by Charles Dickens. And watched their on-screen adaptations. My favourite one to read was A Tale of Two Cities. My favourite one to watch was the aforementioned Muppet classic, but I generally enjoy a good Dickens tale, both to read and to watch.

And to star in of course, because I have appeared in two stage versions of Oliver! The first was for a primary school Christmas concert. My class did a rendition of ‘Food Glorious Food’. I played the pivotal role of ‘nondescript orphan’. My costume was a bin bag.

The second time was much later in my scholastic career, when I was in sixth form. I had a mate who was quite big on being in school productions and he got the plum role of none other than Bill Sykes. Me and my other friend auditioned to keep him company (and also cos we thought it would be a good way to meet girls – it was not). We were given the unforgettable roles of ‘First Bow Street Runner’ and ‘Second Bow Street Runner’.

A Bow Street Runner was a sort of policeman. We had a line each. We also got to do a comedy run, which wasn’t nearly as funny as we hoped it would be.

I was First Bow Street Runner. My line was “Stand Back! Stand Back!”

Surprisingly Second Bow Street Runner was a slightly meatier role. He got the line “This gentleman seems to know the lady.” He made the most of it and delivered it in a slightly different way for each of the performances.

Oh the fun we had.

Pochi Vedono Come Siamo, Ma Tutti Vedono Quello Che Fingiamo Di Essere

Makivelli

It’s Friday, so hang up your scruples and enjoy a few vices.

But don’t do anything too Machiavellian.

Unless you want to of course.

I have gone with a Machievellian theme for this week’s ‘Artist’s Corner’

Because this week I present my fairly rubbish drawing of none other than Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli, a man as underhand and duplicitous as they came.

I imagine.

I don’t know, I haven’t done even the most basic research for this.

Maybe he just wrote stuff with duplicitous character in and he was actually a nice chap.

Although, if my artistic rendition is to be believed (and in the end what other evidence do we have?) he probably was a little bit naughty.

Nowhere So Busy A Man As He Than He, And Yet He Seemed Busier Than He Was

Chaucer

Ah, tis Friday, the day that cometh at the end of the week and doth mark the weekend.

And, after something of a European tour of literary greats, I return to these shores for one of our own. And if Shakespeare is very much the scourge of the GCSE English student, then Chaucer must surely be the equivalent for the English A-level student.

Not that I have an English A-level, nor have I read any Chaucer. I think there’s a copy of The Canterbury Tales on my bookshelf but I can’t say it’s ever been opened.

I have been to Canterbury though, which must count for something.

Mit Dem Wissen Wächst Der Zweifel

Goethe

This week’s literary great, captured in my inimitable artistic style, is one Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, who was a German writer of not inconsiderable repute.

As with so many of the literary figures I’ve featured, I’ve never read anything he’s written, but I hear he was pretty good. Maybe I’ll learn German. There’s a whole load of Goethe Institutes dotted around the world where I could do that if I had the money and the time to do so.

Alas I have neither at the moment. I could always read a translation of his works, but where’s the fun in that?

Не продается вдохновенье, Но можно рукопись продать.

Pushkin

Another Friday, another, frankly dreadful, portrait of a literary great. And today we travel to Russia to meet Alexander Pushkin, who apparently was quite good at writing. Not so good at duelling though by all accounts and he met his premature end at the hands of his French brother-in-law, who apparently had a bit of a thing for Pushkin’s wife. It was all a bit unfortunate really, but Pushkin had already churned out a fair bit of literature by that point so it wasn’t all bad.

Maybe I’ll read some of it one day. Not in Russian obviously, that would be really hard. But I expect some of it has been translated into English by now.

 

Lasciate Ogni Speranza, Voi Ch’Entrate

Dante

Continuing my theme of drawing third-rate portraits of well know literary figures, here is my attempt at capturing the reasonably talented Dante Alighieri, who is perhaps best known for his Divine Comedy. I haven’t read it, but I do enjoy a good comedy so I’m sure I’d really like it. He is cited as an influence on many subsequent literary greats, including, but not limited to, Milton, Chaucer and Tennyson.

But his greatest legacy is probably the fact that the ‘Inferno’ bit of the Divine comedy was the inspiration behind Dan Brown’s fourth Robert Langdon novel of the same name. Unlike the Divine Comedy, I’ve actually read Dan Brown’s Inferno and I can honestly say I didn’t dislike it as much as some of Dan Brown’s other novels. Which is high praise indeed.

 

La Senda De La Virtud Es Muy Estrecha Y El Camino Del Vicio, Ancho Y Espacioso

cervantes

Another Friday, another doodle and, as per the last two weeks here is yet another depiction of a great literary figure. And it’s none other than the great Spanish writer and one of the world’s first novelists, Miguel de Cervantes.

He’s probably best known for writing Don Quixote, which to be honest I’ve never read. I don’t even know what it’s about. But more educated people seem to think it’s quite good.

For ages I thought it was called Donkey Hotay and wondered why one of the first novels ever written would be about a donkey called Hotay. I realise the stupidity of that particular thought process, not least the fact that if it was actually written about a donkey, the title would have the Spanish word for donkey and it would’ve been called El Burro Hotay.

I might one day write a book called Donkey Hotay and, with any luck, it’ll be just as seminal as Cervantes’ novel. And then I won’t seem so stupid after all.

J’aime Mieux Un Vice Commode Qu’une Fatigante Vertu

Moliere

It’s Friday and therefore time for my regular doodle, which this week continues the theme I started last week of producing portraits of some of history’s greatest literary and cultural figures.

And what better person to follow on from Shakespeare, in these times of Brexit, than the man some might consider to be his Francophone equivalent, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, otherwise known as Molière?

Although he really wasn’t as good as Shakespeare truth be told.

And I should know.

I studied a few Molière  plays during my university days. It’s probably my main claim to being vaguely intellectual.

Although I didn’t much understand them to be honest

 

Better A Witty Fool Than A Foolish Wit

Shakespeare

Today begins a new theme on Artist’s Corner. For the next few weeks I’ll be producing portraits of some of history’s greatest literary and cultural figures. Because what better tribute to these great minds than a slightly rubbish doodle?

Is this a portrait of Shakespeare I see before me?

Er, yes it is.

 

 

Misinterpreting Literature

The Book Thief is a 2005 novel that was adapted into a 2013 film of the same name. I haven’t read the book or seen the film but I imagine I’d probably enjoy both. Certainly what I do know of them suggests that they are worthy works that depict the horrors of the Nazi regime and I really shouldn’t be making fun of them in any way.

And I’m not.

But the title did inspire my latest doodle, which, as it turns out, has nothing much to do with either the novel or the movie.

But I still think ‘The Book Thief’ is as appropriate a name as any for my latest creation…

Book Thief

The Leader We Deserve

In these troubled times we need strong and stable leadership.

We need consistency.

In any given situation we need a guidance on what the best solution probably is.

We need someone who can generally point us in the right direction.

Of course nobody’s perfect but we need a figurehead who is right more often that they are wrong.

I’m not sure any of us have that at the moment.

I think it’s time for something new.

This may be radical thinking but I propose a new leader to take us where we need to go.

All bow down before…

…The Rule Of Thumb!

IMG_0098

Weathering The Storm With A Nice Cup Of Tea

I was slightly nervous about posting this week’s oeuvre for ‘Artist’s Corner’.

It might be a touch controversial.

I can imagine some people might get offended.

There may be anger and vitriol.

Maybe some things shouldn’t be shared with world.

But art is art and it behooves me to post this no matter what the reaction.

Because if people are upset, I hope with time they will be able to get over it and appreciate this for what it really is.

Which is, after all, just ‘A Storm In A Teacup.’

IMG_0100

Always Read The Label

It’s Friday, which is the day that, when I can be bothered, I post something that I claim is art, even though it really isn’t.

Even accepting the notion that art is in the eye of the beholder, and that anything can therefore qualify as art, it would be a stretch to claim I’ve actually achieved anything remotely artistic with my ‘Artist’s Corner’ feature.

But today that’s about to change because, ladies and gentlemen of the blogosphere, I give you this masterpiece:

IMG_0095

Now you might claim that all I’ve done here is rip the label off a tin of tomatoes and replaced it with a white self adhesive label onto which I’ve written the word worms.

And you’d be right, that is all I’ve done.

It isn’t an actual can of worms and not even a particularly gullible small child would fall for it. Mrs Proclaims was, nonetheless, a tad apprehensive when I opened the above can earlier this week to make a sea food pasta dish. She ate it but she did eye the squid with a little more suspicion than usual.

But it is art nonetheless, because my ‘can of worms’ is representative of all of the metaphorical ‘cans of worms’ being opened at the moment, all over the world (but often by one man in particular…).

When you think about it I’ve been very very clever here.

Probably the most clever of all the artists.

 

You’ll be egg-static when you read this post – it’s full of egg-cellent yolks

Welcome to another ‘Artist’s Corner’, the regular feature on my blog, which imaginary critics are calling “absolutely pointless” and “the worst thing I’ve ever seen on any blog ever”.

Some pretty hurtful imaginary comments there but regardless I press on with my poor attempts at art.

Normally I’d unveil a fairly rubbish drawing at this point but this week I decided to use the camera bit on my phone to create some ‘concept’ art.

Actually there’ll be a few of these coming up in the next few weeks – I did get a little ‘snap-happy’ once I started.

To begin with though I drew a face on an egg. Hence the ‘egg-based’ puns which featured heavily in the title to this post but have been strangely absent in the post itself.

I expect there’ll be some in the comments though – and yes dear readers that is an invitation to make some egg-based puns in the comments. I’ll be disappointed if there aren’t any now.

Also, if you’re in the mood, you can come up with a name for my little friend.

IMG_0090

But not Eggy McEggface.

I think we’re all better than that.

And also it’s probably best to not get too attached – the morning after I took that photo he made a rather delicious omelette.

99

The number ’99’ is surprisingly ubiquitous. One shy of the more well-rounded ‘100’, ’99’ could well have been lost in the shadows of its more illustrious neighbour. After-all ‘100’ is a power of ten, that most noble of numeric families upon which the decimal system is entirely dependent. Our understanding of currency, measurements (presuming one uses the more sensible metric system over the perplexingly inconsistent imperial system) and even, to a certain extent, time (ok not really – seconds, minute, hours, days, weeks, months and years have little to do with decimalisation but when we get to the big measurements – decades, centuries and millennia – my point (sort of) stands) is all dependent on powers of ten.

For ’99’ to have carved out not one, but several identities, against that back drop, is pretty impressive. Ok there are occasions when the success of ’99’ is linked to its proximity to 100 – how many times are items priced at 99p, or £1.99, £2.99 (feel free to insert your own currency here if you don’t regularly use the rapidly diminishing pound as your money of choice) to create the illusion they’re cheaper than they really are (I’m not paying £3 for that mug when I can get this one for £2.99)? Continue reading 99

Free As A Bird

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Another Monday and another ‘Artists Corner’.

Except that I’m supposed to do these on a Friday according to my 2017 blogging schedule.

Monday is ‘long post day’.

But, after another week of stress in the world of work, I continue to be a little out of synch with the blogosphere.

In the greater scheme of things it doesn’t really matter. There are bigger things in this world to worry about.

Like the fact that tomorrow is my birthday and I have to go to work. I hate working on my birthday.

Anyway, I’ll probably post something tomorrow about that. And I’ll expect my comments section to be full of birthday wishes.

Back to today though and I’m belatedly posting my weekly contribution to Haylee’s Moodle Army.

This week she gave us free rein to do what we want.

So I was going to do something depicting a lion who had escaped from his cage (so ‘free’, but also ‘reign’ because the lion is the king of all the animals.), but upon his escape he was going to have set up a business selling spring water and he’d be selling the bottles as a ‘3 for 2’ offer (so ‘sort-of-free’ rain).

In the end that seemed like quite an ambitious proposal for someone with my artistic skills so I drew this pigeon instead.

pigeon

 

Outside The Comfort Zone

new-jamproc-3

It finally happened, after nearly three months of following a fairly consistent blogging schedule (longer posts on Monday, approximations of poetry on Wednesdays and a slightly rubbish doodle on Fridays) I’ve managed to fall behind.

I’m not worried, I regularly disappeared for weeks on end in 2016 and, nearly three full months in, 2017 is already looking like a significantly better blogging year. Not necessarily a better year in any other respect, although 2016 is oft much maligned as the ‘worst year ever’ and certainly Brexit and Trump made it a pretty bad year politically and lots of celebrities dying made it bad year for people who like celebrities, and I wouldn’t say 2016 was a vintage year for me personally because it wasn’t, but I’d be hard-pressed to say that it was manifestly worse than 2015 in that respect. So far 2017, while seemingly better on the ‘celebrities dying’ front (as far as I’m aware), is still suffering from the ridiculousness of Donald over there and the imminent triggering of Article 50 over here. On a personal level, there is much to be optimistic about but little in the way of the ‘realisation’ of any of that, so, while 2017 has not been significantly worse than 2015 or 2016, I’m not sure I could claim it’s been much better. But it’s early days and there’s the potential for some personal growth in the next few months.

But the last few weeks have been arduous and I’ve been maintaining a blogging schedule that is reasonably consistent against the backdrop of a job that is, at times, more than a little challenging. I like a challenge, I don’t want to be bored at work, but ‘challenging’ can be synonymous with ‘time-consuming’.

So missing a couple of scheduled blog posts is not the end of the world. Continue reading Outside The Comfort Zone

Super Moodles

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Just as the working week was getting a bit too much to handle, Friday has swooped in to save us.

Friday is my favourite day for many reasons.

Well one reason mainly.

Which is obviously the weekend, and all the ‘not-having-to-go-to-work’ that that entails.

But I also like Friday because that is the day I’ve chosen for my regular foray into the visual arts.

And this week, like for the last seven weeks, I’m participating in Haylee’s (off of Aloada Bobbins) regular Moodle Army challenge.

This week’s challenge was to BECOME THE HERO OF OUR OWN STORY!

I think this could be interpreted in so many ways. Maybe I could have drawn something that represents my greatest strengths. Or a moment when I was truly the hero of the hour. It has happened. And not just metaphorically.

Well mostly metaphorically.

However, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to draw myself as my favourite superhero.

But who to pick?

Superman was always one of my favourites as a small child. I used to have a Superman costume and I loved the Christopher Reeves films.

Well the first two anyway.

Then again, Spider-Man was also great. I didn’t have the costume but I really wanted the costume. And if my love of Superman waned a little as I got older, I still thought Spider-Man was pretty cool well into my teens.

These days, though, it’s hard to get past Batman. I think I’d make a brilliant Batman. If I was a billionaire. And good at fighting . And had led a significantly more tragic life.

So which hero to portray myself as for the Moodle Army Challenge?

In the end I couldn’t pick so I chose all three.

So here is a picture of SuperSpiderBatJames. Evildoers beware!

Superbatspiderman

 

Heralding Another Moodle

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Another Friday, another ‘Artist’s Corner’. Once again the inspiration for this week’s masterpiece comes from the marvellous Moodle Army Challenge from Haylee’s Aloada Bobbins.

This week the challenge was to ‘Blow your own trumpet’.

I don’t have a musical bone in my body. I own a five-stringed electric guitar. I’ve modified it from the usual six-stringed instrument through a dedicated lack of maintenance and care, which has taken me several years to perfect.

I sometimes still like to strum it but aside from muscle memory enabling me to remember how to play the first few chords of Green Day’s ‘Basket Case’, a perennial favourite from my teenage years, I can’t remember how to play very much at all.

I sometimes think I would like to learn to play again, but to what end I’m not sure. I’m unlikely to be headlining Glastonbury anytime soon.

Or ever.

And if I can’t play the guitar, I certainly can’t play the trumpet.

But I can blow my own ‘metaphorical’ trumpet rather well.

I know what I’m good at.

Which is no small amount of things.

For example I can differentiate between the various remote controls which form part of my TV viewing experience these days.

I can usually put together flat-pack furniture on my own, even when the instructions advise that two people should be involved.

I can cook a mean boil-in-the-bag rice.

However, one of the things in this world that I’m less good at is drawing.

But I’d never let something like a total lack of talent and ability stop me from doing anything.

And so here is a picture of me blowing my own trumpet:

trumpet

And here is Green Day with the aforementioned ‘Basket Case’:

 

 

So Sally Can Wait

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Welcome to another ‘Artist’s Corner’. Yet again the inspiration for this week’s oeuvre comes courtesy of the Moodle Army Challenge from Haylee’s Aloada Bobbins.

This weeks challenge was to ‘Look Back’.

I’ve been feeling quite nostalgic lately, not least because of the recent ‘Stuff I used to do but don’t do any more’ series of posts that I’ve been writing. Clearly the blogosphere enjoys a bit of nostalgia too because parts 1 and 2 are currently the most popular posts I’ve ever written for this blog.

Anyway, enough self-congratulating, (although clearly part 3 has a lot to live up to…) the point is that I have been ‘looking back’ quite a lot recently. Continue reading So Sally Can Wait

Jedi James

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Time again for another ‘Artist’s Corner’.

Once again I’m participating in the Moodle Army Challenge from Haylee’s Aloada Bobbins.

This week’s challenge is to PUT YOURSELF AT THE CENTRE OF THE UNIVERSE!

I wasn’t really sure how to interpret this one to be honest. Disappointingly I couldn’t think of a clever play on words. I considered drawing a half man/half horse combination in space and dubbing it ‘The Centaur of the Universe’ but that seemed beyond my level of artistic skill and, also, I’m not sure it would have been that funny. We’ll never know though because I didn’t do that.

Instead I thought an appropriately tenuous link might be to just to draw something space-related. Continue reading Jedi James

The Luck Of The Drawing

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Friday is normally my favourite day of the week, but when it comes at the end of a week when I’ve been off work anyway, it’s less of a good thing.

Fortunately, Friday seems to be becoming the day I post my contribution to the ever growing Moodle Army – brought to you by Haylee from Aloada Bobbins. The entire point of the Moodle Army is to draw doodles that make you happy and I was certainly more upbeat once I’d completed this one.

This week’s challenge was to ‘Draw Your Lucky Charm’

I don’t really have a lucky charm but I pondered the theme nonetheless and my response is this:

Lucky Charms Aren’t ‘Lucky’ For Everyone…

rabbit

 

Superfrog

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Welcome to another ‘Artist’s Corner’.

This time it’s a picture of a frog with superpowers.

I like to call him Superfrog.

I’m not sure if I’m in breach of some kind of copyright by creating a superhero with the word ‘super’ in his name but I’m pretty sure that 80’s cartoon ‘SuperTed’ and 80s kids TV show ‘Super Gran’ had nothing to do with DC, so I’m probably ok.

Although  a cursory search of the internet reveals that ‘Superfrog’ already is not a new idea. There is a character called ‘Superfrog’ from a 90’s computer game, so some 20+ years later it would look like I stole the idea.

But I didn’t. Honestly.

I created my version of ‘Superfrog’ back in the era of ‘Super Gran’ and ‘SuperTed’, and therefore way before the 90s computer game came out. I wrote a story about ‘Superfrog’ when I was in primary school.

I was really proud of it. Continue reading Superfrog