James Proclaims (4)

It’s November.

November is a rubbish month.

All the shops are full of Christmas stuff but Christmas is still ages away.

It’s cold.

It’s dark.

I will probably be ill for at least some of this month.

It’s not that surprising that November is commandeered annually as a month in which to achieve formidable things like growing a moustache or writing a novel.

For yes, November is traditionally National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) when people are encouraged to write fifty thousand words in thirty days and thus achieve the awesome feat of writing (probably quite a bad) short novel. Really it should be called International Novel Writing Month given that people participate all over the world. But InNoWriMo isn’t as catchy as NaNoWriMo.

In a completely unrelated campaign, known as Movember, November is also the month in which some men go from having no facial hair to having a moustache in order to raise awareness of prostate cancer.

Writing a novel and growing a moustache both seem like admirable ways in which to help a miserable cold month pass by a little more pleasantly.

However I never participate in Movember. I’m not churlish, but as I ‘m rarely clean-shaven it seems preposterous to pretend that me having facial hair is going to raise awareness of anything other than the fact that I don’t shave very often.

NaNoWriMo is something I have attempted and failed at twice. If I were to attempt it this year I would also fail. I did succeed in writing quite a bad short novel over a two year period once but that’s not really the same thing. You can read it here if you haven’t got anything better to do.

Fortunately this year I have a blog and having a blog means I can participate in something other than NaNoWriMo and Movember. Something eminently achievable.

For November is also National Blog Posting Month or NaBloPoMo (again I would argue that it should be International Blog Posting Month). To participate all I have to do is write a post every day for the entire month of November. Thirty posts in thirty days. Is that possible? Well yes. I did it in June. Frankly it’s not even a challenge.

And as I managed to post very little in October, it seems like a brilliant way of reviving my ailing blog.

As evidenced by this particular entry, not everything I write over the next month is going to be great.

But quality is not prerequisite of success in this scenario.

13 thoughts on “It’s The Taking Part That Counts

  1. There you go explaining yourself again 🙂 I’ll try to keep up with your posts this month, but I’ve been a little aloof in my relationship with WordPress these days.

    A few years ago I completed NaNoWriMo. I finished and then nothing happened. I never once went back and read, revised, edited, or shared my “novel” with anyone. Not sure what the means or where I should go from here, but I guess the 50,000 words are there if I ever want to flush them out or down the toilet.

    If I had read this post yesterday, I may have considered NaBloPoMo, but given that I feel a lazy November coming on it’s far too much to ask of myself this year. I did sign up for the (self-created) fleece-blanket-and-glass-of-red-wine-in-hand-on-couch-challenge though.

    I’ll stop now. I think I am explaining too much 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I like your challenge better. Maybe I’ll do that one next year. Kudos on completing NaNoWriMo. I usually get to about 20,000, realise I’m way behind schedule and give up. But I treasure those 20,000 words of nonsense and bad grammar nonetheless…
      I too am a little aloof with WordPress at the moment. It’s too difficult to find the time to read other people’s blogs and write my own, so for the sake of keeping this one going I’ve had to cut down on my reading and commenting on other blogs which is sad, but hopefully I’ll find a blog/work balance soon…

      Liked by 1 person

  2. If you don’t mind, I’ll join your club of getting off kilter with Word Press lately. Some things are just too confusing to get caught up in. I do get a blog out now and then, hope others read them a little more diligently than I do theirs (yes, selfish of me I know). But I do have the plea that I’m (slowly) writing another novel,

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ahhh… now, James… November is a perfectly lovely month. I am giggling as I read your post because I am currently polishing my next post about my love of November. November expects little from me personally. I have a marvelous week off from school and the weather here in the south is sweater worthy only. Cool, not cold, and late season tree color. November is kind in Georgia and relaxed. It’s an old friend who drops by for coffee…
    I enjoyed this post as much as I Georgia Novembers…I look forward to reading more.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Georgia Novembers do indeed sound lovely and I envy you. But UK Novembers are an endurance from start to finish in my experience. It pleases me though, that in other parts of the world there are people experiencing pleasant Novembers 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That makes me terribly sad for you and others who can’t experience the sensations of late fall in the South of the U.S. My son and his family live in South Korea, and he misses this season deeply. But the UK has its own marvelous mystique… Well I shall enjoy something pumpkin-spiced in your honor. American consumers are crazy about anything pumpkin-spiced (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves mixture) during this season. It’s quite ridiculous actually. Wishing you a subtle, kind November.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Happy Thanksgiving to you, too. That when Americans (a total misnomer from the start) celebrate the kindness of the native americans, (only a short few centuries before completely overruning their land), by gourging ourselves on processed turkey and “all the trimmings”, (Not complaining, mind you, the turkey’s quite tasty.)
    I second your decision to not grow a mustache.

    Liked by 1 person

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